Signs of the Times?

This week, in an interview with ABC’s Christiane Amanpour, the Reverend Franklin Graham, son of the famous evangelistic preacher Billy Graham, proclaimed to a national television audience that signs of the nearness of the end times were abundantly apparent in an increase of wars, famines, and earthquakes. Graham asserted that, based on his understanding of Matthew chapter 24 where Jesus speaks of these very events occurring during a time of great tribulation (what he interprets to be the end times), the second coming of Christ is imminent. It is popular belief in evangelical and fundamentalist circles that the many armed conflicts and natural disasters that occur today are divine “birth pains” leading up to the main events of earth’s destruction via God’s judgment and the return of Jesus Christ physically to this world. The only problem with Graham’s assessment, besides what I believe to be a mistaken understanding of eschatology (study of last things), is that wars, famines, and earthquakes are most certainly not increasing in frequency. Continue reading

Post-Evangelical: The Journey Explained

Every once-in-awhile I go back and read old posts in order to see the evolution of my own thought, among other things.  Recently, I went back to this post and reread what I wrote concerning evangelical Christians and why I no longer considered myself one of them.  This blog post has received the most hits of any article I’ve posted in the nearly two years this website has existed.  It has had, literally, hundreds of views since its posting in January of 2009.  I have to admit that I was a bit uneasy rereading that post.  Not because of anything I said in particular, but because of the tone.  I strive on this website to not post things that I have not let “settle” for awhile in my mind and emotions.  Clearly, that post was written in a time of high frustration with my evangelical friends in the Christian community.  The critique was a bit harsh, but not dishonest.  I don’t necessarily take back anything I said, but I do wish I had given it a little more time before I abruptly posted something that was highly emotional for me at the time.  I’ve written two posts under the series title “The Mind of the Christian Independent” which I hope have added some clarity as to my current method, but I wanted to offer this piece as a more mature version of the “Why I am no longer an Evangelical Christian” post.  I wanted to take a more level-headed approach to explain where I stand in relation to my former theological tradition.  The label I use for this position is post-evangelical (see the book review posted along with this article which will give you a fuller context for the thoughts expressed in this piece).  There has been a certain evolution in my definition of myself since leaving the evangelical community for good in 2008 and now that I’ve had more time to meditate on things (and realize the aforementioned article was more of a rant), I offer this article as a more full-grown explanation of my frustrations and spiritual journey. Continue reading